Quick Answer: How Does Polio Affect The Body?

What polio does to the body?

Polio, or poliomyelitis, is a disabling and life-threatening disease caused by the poliovirus.

The virus spreads from person to person and can infect a person’s spinal cord, causing paralysis (can’t move parts of the body)..

What is the cause and effect of polio?

Polio is an acute contagious viral illness caused by the polio virus. It affects the muscles and nerves throughout the body and may cause permanent paralysis or even lead to death. There are three patterns of polio infection; subclinical, paralytic and non-paralytic.

Where did polio originally come from?

1894, first outbreak of polio in epidemic form in the U.S. occurs in Vermont, with 132 cases. 1908, Karl Landsteiner and Erwin Popper identify a virus as the cause of polio by transmitting the disease to a monkey.

Can a person get polio twice?

Does past infection with polio make a person immune? There are three types of polio virus. Lifelong immunity usually depends on which type of virus a person contracts. Second attacks are rare and result from infection with a polio virus of a different type than the first attack.

What effect does polio have on the limbs?

In less than 1% of cases, polio causes permanent paralysis of the arms, legs or breathing muscles. Between 5 and 10% of people who develop paralytic polio will die. Physical symptoms may return 15 years or more after the first polio infection. These new symptoms are called the ‘late effects of polio’.

How long do polio survivors live?

For years, most polio survivors lived active lives, their memory of polio mainly forgotten, their health status stable. But by the late 1970s, survivors who were 20 or more years past their original diagnosis began noting new problems, including fatigue, pain, breathing or swallowing problems, and additional weakness.

What animal did polio come from?

The discovery by Karl Landsteiner and Erwin Popper in 1908 that polio was caused by a virus, a discovery made by inoculating macaque monkeys with an extract of nervous tissue from polio victims that was shown to be free of other infectious agents.

Does post polio syndrome affect brain?

The new weakness of PPS appears to be related to the degeneration of individual nerve terminals in the motor units. A motor unit is formed by a nerve cell (or motor neuron) in the spinal cord or brain stem and the muscle fibers it activates. The polio virus attacks specific neurons in the brain stem and spinal cord.

How is polio diagnosed?

Doctors often recognize polio by symptoms, such as neck and back stiffness, abnormal reflexes, and difficulty swallowing and breathing. To confirm the diagnosis, a sample of throat secretions, stool or a colorless fluid that surrounds your brain and spinal cord (cerebrospinal fluid) is checked for poliovirus.

Does polio have a vaccine?

Inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) is the only polio vaccine that has been given in the United States since 2000. IPV is given by shot in the leg or arm, depending on the patient’s age. Oral polio vaccine (OPV) is used in other countries. CDC recommends that children get four doses of polio vaccine.

How does polio affect a person’s daily life?

It has been reported that 50–85% of the persons who suffered from poliomyelitis about 30–40 years ago are now experiencing new symptoms of increased muscle weakness, fatigue, pain and muscle atrophy (1–6).

When was polio at its worst?

At its peak in the 1940s and 1950s, polio would paralyze or kill over half a million people worldwide every year.

What stopped polio?

Several key strategies have been outlined for stopping polio transmission: High infant immunization coverage with four doses of oral polio vaccine (OPV) in the first year of life in developing and endemic countries, and routine immunization with OPV and/or IPV elsewhere.

Can you recover from polio?

People who have milder polio symptoms usually make a full recovery within 1–2 weeks. People whose symptoms are more severe can be weak or paralyzed for life, and some may die. After recovery, a few people might develop “post-polio syndrome” as long as 30–40 years after their initial illness.

Does polio affect the heart?

Polio patients have a high prevalence of risk factors for coronary heart disease as well as cardiac-related disease. These factors include dyslipidemia. Although our present findings are similar to those from previous studies, we found a higher percentage of women with dyslipidemia.

Can polio affect offspring?

When women had poliomyelitis during a pregnancy, more miscarriages and stillbirths were observed, as was paralysis of the newborn ( congenital polio). The vaccines for polio are made up of inactivated viruses and, if given in pregnancy, do not seem to cause any harm to the developing embryo or fetus.

Who is most at risk for polio?

Pregnant women, people with weakened immune systems — such as those who are HIV-positive — and young children are the most susceptible to the poliovirus. If you have not been vaccinated, you can increase your risk of contracting polio when you: travel to an area that has had a recent polio outbreak.